Faculty & Leadership


Our leadership and instructors are all faculty at Houston Baptist University, and approach life and study as enthusiastic learners, integrated generalists, and committed Christians.

Leadership

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John Mark Reynolds is the Provost of Houston Baptist University, and official godfather of The Academy. Before coming to HBU, he was the founder and director of the Torrey Honors Institute at Biola University. He has written and collaborated on a number of books, including Three Views on the Creation and Evolution Debate, co-edited with J.P. Moreland, Against All Gods: What’s Right and Wrong About the New Atheism, with Phillip E. Johnson, and Towards a Unified Platonic Human Psychology, a close examination of Plato’s presentation of the soul in the Timaeus. Recently he published When Athens Met Jerusalem: An Introduction to Classical and Christian Thought, which argues for a reconciliation of classical reason and Christian faith, and edited The Great Books Reader, a book of excerpts and essays on the most influential books in western civilization. Dr. Reynolds lectures frequently on ancient philosophy, philosophy of science, home-schooling, and cultural trends. His other areas of interest include Star Trek, the Romanovs, the Titanic, and the English Civil War. He regularly appears on radio talk shows, including the Hugh Hewitt Show, and actively blogs on cultural issues.

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Jodey D. Hinze is the Interim Dean of Smith College of Liberal Arts, which gives him charge over the Academy, the Honors College, and the Master of Liberal Arts at HBU. His experience, both teaching and practicing law, gives him a clear vision for the importance of words, and makes him a passionate advocate for the liberal arts. Dean Hinze holds a Doctor of Jurisprudence,cum laude, and a Master of Arts in Philosophical Theology,summa cum laude. He was the Chief Notes and Comments Editor for the Houston Business and Tax Law Journal  during law school and now practices in the area of business formations and acquisitions and civil appellate litigation. He is interested in corporate criminal liability, legal hermeneutics, meta-ethics, and applied ethics. He is a Sam Walton Fellow and serves on the Bio-ethics Committee at Memorial Herman Southwest. He was named the Advisor of the Year for 2010-2011 and was nominated for the Opal Goolsby Outstanding Teaching Award in 2009-2010, 2010-2011, winning in 2011-2012. He enjoys shooting, backpacking, rock climbing, music, reading and writing. He is married to Patti, and they have three children. He loves dogs and students. He wears bow ties. Often.

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Cate MacDonald is the Director of The Academy and an Instructor of Theology. She has a Master of Arts in Spiritual Formation and Soul Care, and was educated at The Torrey Honors Institute at Biola University and Talbot School of Theology. Cate was homeschooled her entire life, and tutored throughout high school in the great books, classics, and Euclidean Geometry by Fritz Hinrichs of Escondido Tutorial Services. A native Californian, she’s still, very reluctantly, adjusting to Houston’s humidity. She is a host of The City, a podcast of HBU, a writer for MereOrthodoxy.com, a writer, speaker, and Director of Staff and Student Care for Wheatstone Ministries, and most recently contributed a chapter on Lent to a book on the Christian church year, entitled, Let Us Keep the Feast. Unrelatedly, she likes to cook. 

 

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David J. Gilbert is the Associate Director of The Academy and Instructor of Philosophy at HBU. He received his Master of Arts in Philosophy of Religion and Ethics at Talbot School of Theology at Biola University and has taught philosophy and religion on board three deployed United States Navy aircraft carriers. As a Texan and identical twin, David defends the use of “y’all” and constantly refers to himself as “we.” He cares about the history of cinema, books by Dostoevsky, and a solid joke. 

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Peter David Gross is the Director of Staff Development for The Academy. He is also the Executive Director of Wheatstone Ministries, a nonprofit that invites youth into Christian adulthood. In addition to working for the renewal of church and culture through Christian maturity, he thinks about art, anthropology, theology, and philosophy, and he paints, draws, designs, and writes.

Faculty and Staff


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Timothy E. G. Bartel is an Instructor of Literature at The Academy and HBU. He is a husband, father, writer, and educator from Whittier, CA. He holds an Masters of Fine Arts from Seattle Pacific University and a PhD from the University of St. Andrews. His written work has appeared in Christianity and Literature, Saint Katherine Review, Relief, and The Other Journal. He is the co-founder and editor of the online literary review Californios: A Review from the Ends of the Earth, and has recently published The Martyr, The Grizzly, and The Gold, a collection of poems about California.

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Jonathan Mueller is the Academic Administrator for The Academy, and lead teacher for our lower school classes. Jon is a seeker and a learner. He is as likely to be reading the memoirs of Antarctic explorers as those of Proust. He talks about language a lot. Jon and his wife Megan both graduated from Biola University, where he is a perpetual member of the Torrey Honors Institute.

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Kris Yee is a teaching assistant for The Academy, as well as an instructor for lower school classes. He graduated magna cum laude from Biola University and is a perpetual member of the Torrey Honors Institute. He is currently one semester away from earning his Master of Arts in Philosophy from Houston Baptist University. With many years of experience working with young people, whether as a youth ministry intern, a tutor, or a camp counselor, Kris is deeply committed to impacting the lives of students. He loves going to punk shows, tends to cry when reading children’s literature, and finds the movie Hook to be consistently inspiring.

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Stephen Vaughan is a teaching assistant at The Academy and working on a Master of Arts in Philosophy.  He completed his undergraduate work at East Texas Baptist University with a major in Kinesiology and a minor in Leadership. While at ETBU, Stephen worked at a challenge course, using activities and dialogue to promote team building, communication, and leadership.  He has a wide array of academic interests, varying from 19th century literature to metaphysics of being. Some of his favorite authors include Dostoevsky, Nietzsche, and Plato.

Lecturers


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Dr. Robert D. Stacey is Associate Provost at Houston Baptist University. He teachers Government and Political Theory at HBU, and lectures for Great Books III and American History for The Academy. His current research focuses on the inherent tension between liberty and security and how these two vital interests can be balanced in an age of modern terrorism. His previous publications include Sir William Blackstone and Common Law, in addition to a host of articles and reviews on topics ranging from intelligence oversight to presidential elections. He is a homeschooling father of three boys in Katy, TX.

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David J. Davis is the Director of the Master of Liberal Arts and Assistant Professor in History at Houston Baptist University. At HBU, he teaches on a variety of topics including medieval and early modern European history, the history of Britain, and the history of technology and science, where he was awarded the Opal Goolsby Outstanding Teaching Award in 2012-2013. He holds a Ph.D. in History from the University of Exeter, where he was awarded the Overseas Research Student Award and served as a researcher for the British Book Trade Index. He researches the English Reformation and the early printing trade in Europe. Recently, he published his first book Seeing Faith, Printing Pictures: Religious Identity during the English Reformation (Brill, 2013). Also, his essays and reviews appear in Books & Culture, The American Conservative, The New Criterion, and The Imaginative Conservative. His other interests include hiking, cycling, swimming, soccer, writing rather poor poetry, defending the inherent virtues of coffee, explaining why Erasmus’s Praise of Folly may be the best book ever written, and celebrating most things Texan or Welsh.